Travel throughout the island, exploring the Moai, the giant heads sculpted from volcanic quarries

Climb on the extinct volcanoes, witness the surf pound the rugged volcanic coastline and travel to the site of the ancient birdman cult. This adventure trip to Easter Island highlights the mysterious archaeological heritage as well as the rugged beauty of the island and culture of the Rapa Nuians.

Easter Island or Rapa Nui in Polynesian, is one of the most isolated islands on Earth. A territory of Chile, it lies far off in the Pacific Ocean, roughly halfway to Tahiti. Known as one of the world’s sacred sites, it is most famous for its enigmatic giant stone busts, built centuries ago, which reflect the history of the dramatic rise and fall of the most isolated Polynesian culture.

Located at the southeasternmost point of the Polynesian Triangle, Easter Island is known for its 887 extant monumental statues, called moai, created by the early Rapanui people. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site with much of the island protected within Rapa Nui National Park. Measures only 8 by 15 miles. Easter Island and surrounding islets such as Motu Nui and Motu Iti form the summit of a large volcanic mountain rising over 2,000 metres (6,600ft) from the sea bed.

Arrive in Hanga Roa, Easter Island.
Visit Hanga Roa, Moai Sites, Rano Kau Volcano, Ahu Ruins, Rano Raraku Volcano, Sebastian Englert Museum, and the Handicraft Market.
Finish in Hanga Roa.
Return flight to Santiago or Lima.

All of the sites, which can be visited for free, are mostly found along the coastline of the island. First time visitors may be struck by how many archaeological sites there are around the island, where you can be virtually alone as the only people visiting. Each village typically had an ahu if not several moai, and thus on a drive around the south coast of the island, every mile contains several sites where you might see ruins.

The English name of the island commemorates its European discovery by a Dutch exploration vessel on Easter Sunday in 1722

Ever since Thor Heyerdahl and a small party of adventurers sailed their raft from South America to the Tuamotu islands, far to the north of Easter Island, a controversy has raged over the origin of the islanders. Today DNA testing has proved conclusively that the Polynesians arrived from the west rather than the east, and that the people of Easter Island are descendants of intrepid voyagers who set out from another island thousands of years ago. Legend says that the people left for Easter Island because their own island was slowly being swallowed by the sea.

Its residents rely much on the tourism and economic links to Chile and daily flights to Santiago. As with many native peoples, the Rapa Nui seek a link to their past and how to integrate their culture with the political, economic, and social realities of today.

Below are links to more travel information such as locations, what to see and do, activities, how to get there, and a history of the myth and legend. Use custom search engine to find your bookings.


Adventure To Easter Island   •   Locations & Activities


• Hanga Roa

• History