Car, Off-Road, and RV – These forms of camping involve using a powered vehicle as an essential element of the camping experience.

Reenactment camping – Reenactment camping employs the methods and equipment appropriate to a specific historic era for personal enjoyment and other purposes such as instruction and entertainment. Historical reenactors seek to replicate the conditions and technologies of such periods as the Wild West, American Civil War, and Medieval times.

Social camping – Many campers enjoy socializing with small groups of fellow campers. Such groups will arrange events throughout the year to allow members with similar interests or from similar geographical areas in order to collaborate. This allows families to form small close-knit societies, and children to form lasting friendships. There are two large organizations in the UK who facilitate this sort of camping: the Caravan Club and the Camping and Caravanning Club.

Some who participate in this sort of camping feel that it brings a closer form of bonding, as members become more mutually dependent than they would otherwise be in modern society. Social camping can also build more of a bond between members of the same family and between different families. It is common for many campers to organize this type of activities with their friends or neighbors. Social camping goes beyond uniting families and it may also give the opportunity for lonely campers to enjoy this type of activity with individuals who share their enthusiasm in this matter.

Because of the bonding this type of camping promotes, it can also be used as a personnel training package is becoming more and more popular and it is also recommended because of the benefits it brings.

In more recent years, those who camp alone have been able to share their experiences with other campers, through blogs and online social networking. There are many online websites especially designed for people who are looking for camping companions or for those who only want to share their experiences with other people. In this case, campers may provide the others with useful tips resulting from their own experience. Individuals who are willing to camp are likely to access this type of websites and connect with other campers, especially if they are novices, because it gives them the opportunity to learn more about this activity.

Camping, or more commonly known simply as PitchPlacing, is the sharing of yards as free tent pitches, facilitated by a free hospitality exchange and social network at PitchPlace.org. Following a similar track to CouchSurfing, users send requests to pitch in members yards around the world.

Survivalist camping – Survivalist campers learn the skills needed to survive in any outdoor situation. This activity may require skills in obtaining food from the wild, emergency medical treatments, orienteering, and pioneering.

Winter camping – Winter camping characteristically refers to wilderness camping in cold seasons in temperate climates, which typically include snow, rather than in areas where snow is present year-round (such as in arctic regions or mountains high enough to maintain permanent snow cover). It puts a premium on high quality and lightness of gear, experience, and nerve – as risks may include frostbite and becoming snowbound.

In addition to packing shelters such as tents or bivouac gear, alternative shelter-building skills are key, such as for snow caves and igloos. Wicking clothing suitable for layering and a regard for appropriate nutrition and food preparation are key.

Camping equipment

The equipment used in camping varies with by intended activity. For instance, in survival camping the equipment consists of small items which have the purpose of helping the camper in providing food, heat and safety. The equipment used in this type of camping must be lightweight and it is restricted to the mandatory items. Other types of camping such as winter camping involve having specially designed equipment in terms of tents or clothing which is strong enough to protect the camper’s body from the wind and cold.

Survival camping involves certain items that campers are recommended to have with them in case something goes wrong and they need to be rescued. A survival kit includes mandatory items which are small and must fit in one’s pocket or which otherwise could be carried on one’s person. This kit is useless in these circumstances if it is kept in the backpack that is left in camp. Such a kit should include a small metal container which can be used to heat water over a campfire, a small length of duct tape which can prove useful in many situations, and an emergency space blanket. These blankets are specially designed to occupy minimal space and are perfect for making emergency shelters, keeping the camper warm. on one person, they are in fact small, lightweight and definitely useful.

Winter camping can be dangerous without respecting the basic rules when it comes to this particular activity.

  • Firstly, the cold is protected against with clothing of three types of layers as follows: a liner layer against the camper’s skin (on winter camping because if it gets wet it dries out very slowly and the wearer could freeze. Rather than cotton, winter campers should wear wool or synthetic materials. The boots must be waterproof and the head must be protected against the cold. Although it seems a good choice, campers are advised not to wear too many pairs of socks as they might restrict blood flow to the feet, resulting in cold feet. Gaiters should also be worn to avoid snow and rain wetting the boots.
  • Secondly, one should include carbohydrates into their diet to keep their body warm as well as to provide energy. Hydration is very important so winter campers should drink plenty of water to keep themselves well hydrated, noting that water stores must be kept from freezing.
  • Thirdly, the tent must be carefully chosen to shelter it from the wind.

List of common equipment – The following is a list of commonly used camping equipment:

  • First aid kit
  • Tent, lean-to, or other form of shelter
  • Hammer or mallet to drive tent stakes into the soil (hammer are often a claw hammer, which is also helpful for removing them)
  • Sleeping bag and/or blankets for warmth
  • Sleeping pad or air mattress to be placed underneath the sleeping bag for cushioning from stones and twigs, as well as for insulation from the ground
  • Lantern or flashlight
  • Hatchet, axe or saw for cutting firewood for a campfire
  • Fire starter or other ignition device for starting a campfire
  • Folding chairs for placement around campfire
  • Ropes for stringing clothes line and for securing the shelter
  • Tarp for adding additional layer of storm protection to a tent, and to shelter dining areas
  • Raincoat or poncho
  • Hiking boots
  • Fishing pole
  • Chuck box to hold camp kitchen items for food preparation, consumption and cleanup
  • Trash bags, for the handling of waste; see leave no trace
  • Cathole trowel for sanitation in areas where a toilet is not provided
  • Insect repellent, particularly one that has DEET
  • Sunscreen for protecting the skin
  • Personal care products and towel
  • Cooler to store perishables and beverages. If electricity is available, a campers will bring non-perishable foods such as dried fruits, nuts, jerky, and MREs.
  • Beverages or portable water filter for areas that have access to rivers or lakes
  • Cooking implements such as a tripod chained grill, Dutch oven, or La Cotta clay pot can be used for cooking on a campfire. A portable stove can be used where campfires are forbidden or impractical. If using a campground with electricity, an electric frying pan or slow cooker can be used.
  • Firewood for campfires
  • Emergency Preparedness Kit
  • Multi-Tool or knife
  • Global Positioning System (GPS)

Much of the remaining needed camping equipment is commonly available in the home, including: dishes, pots and pans; however, many people opt not to use their home items, but instead utilize equipment better tailored for camping. These amenities include heavy plastic tableware and salt and pepper shakers with tops that close in order to shelter the shakers from rain. Old kitchen gear purchased from thrift stores or garage sales may also be used in place of home items as an alternative to buying specialized (and more expensive) camping equipment. Backpackers use lightweight and portable equipment.

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